Galway singer Derek Ellard releases new single in aid of Pieta House for Suicide Prevention Day

Galway singer-songwriter Derek Ellard has released a new single called ‘Understandably Forgivable’ in aid of Pieta House for Suicide Prevention Day. The lyrics deal with themes of loss and grief surrounding suicides and the alarming number of people who attempt to or succeed in ending their lives in the city’s Corrib River.

Regardless of age, gender or background and particularly prevalent in his adopted home of Galway, too many times loved ones have slipped away or have been massively afflicted by their own ability to talk and support each other when they are at their most vulnerable. Written to make light of this flaw. ‘Understandably Forgivable ‘is a call to action for everyone who should have reached out and said something, but didn’t.

The song releases on independent label Umbrella Records today and all of the proceeds from the track will go to Pieta House to aid them in there fight for suicide awareness and prevention.

You can listen on Spotify, Youtube or preferably buy the track on Bandcamp for the suggested €2 price, although those that can afford to can pay more if they wish.

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Bury Me With My Money look inwards with their new single ‘Okay’, exploring the implications of religious upbringing on the psyche.


Bury Me With My Money are a five piece band from Mayo & Galway. They joined indie label Umbrella Records (home to Bannered Mare, Oscar Mild and Derek Ellard & the Future Business Model) in 2018 and have released two singles in the last year, ‘Grow‘ and ‘Marmite‘ both taken from the debut EP ‘Karosi’

Their newest single ‘Okay’ is a quirky mix of synth and acoustic sounds. It talks about the difficulty of being raised in a religious tradition and how breaking away from that can be a psychologically difficult experience, but ultimately leads to positive personal growth. 

I sat down with bandleader Tomás Concannon to chat about the meaning behind the song, the band and what we can expect in the future from BMWMM:

TMFTML: It’s been 9 months since your last single, Marmite, was released. Can you tell me a little bit about what you’ve been up to? Sounds like the band might have a baby in the oven!  
TOMÁS: Ya it’s been a bit of a stretch to be fair… but I’m happy to say we have birthed a baby boy called Adam Downey! To be honest we’re worse than spinal tap when it comes to drummers and despite playing no live shows, Adam is now the fourth drummer to cross the Bury Me With My Money threshold. However, we’re happy to say that power rangers are go! and we’re finally booking shows and begging to tour the EP Karosi at last. We’ve also began pre-production on another set of songs that will likely manifest itself as another EP. 
 
TMFTML: You’ve filled the live bands ranks with some of the finest musicians in the west of Ireland, with members of Race The Flux, Bannered Mare and of course Ka tet. Has the writing process changed from the projects inception? Is it more collaborative now or are you still pulling all of the strings behind the curtain? 
TOMÁS: Ya, we’ve gathered a great bunch of lads now and everyone gels well, which is half the battle. I’m still writing the guts of the songs and Joseph Padfield (Bannered Mare) is still our producer, but I’m also aware that each member is the most talented at their chosen instrument. Unlike the first EP where Joe & myself played almost everything on the EP bar the drums, which were played by Sean Wynne from Oscar Mild, this time round we have the opportunity to workshop the songs with the band and alter them so they are more natural and generally tastier! Half the reason it’s taken so long to get the band gig ready is because the previous EP was written on the computer, piece by piece. It was all very un-natural for a live musician to play and comprehend. So nowadays, I have the restriction of five actual human beings to consider and that’s actually helped in the writing process as there are boundaries to consider now.
 
TMFTML: This project is very different to your previous work with Ka tet. What that a conscious decision, or more of a natural progression towards more atmospheric and electronic soundscapes? Who are some of your main influences on BMWMM’s sound? 
TOMÁS: I played guitar in Ka tet which was a three piece, but I would never have considered myself a guitarist per se. Guitar was a necessary tool to write and perform with Ka tet. So when we broke up, I gave up the struggle to command the guitar and turned inward to Ableton and began experimenting with synths and excessive percussion. At the time I wasn’t even sure if the songs would ever be performed live, so there was no restrictions put on the choice of instruments and sounds I could use to write a song. Then eventually, one drunken night, I tricked Joseph Padfield into agreeing to produce me and we took the spirit of having no restrictions on the soundscape we were making and we just went for it. Of course that came back to bite him in the ass when he had to re-produce them sounds live, but I’m happy to say he’s a genius and he’s nailing it!
TMFTML: You mentioned that ‘Okay’ is about the difficulty of being raised in a religious tradition and how breaking away from that can be a psychologically difficult experience, but ultimately leads to positive personal growth. Tell us a little bit about that. Did you grow up in a very religious household? What age were you when you started to break away from those traditions, and how did that experience effect you personally? 

TOMÁS: I grew up in a very traditional, middle class, rural Irish, catholic home. Then around the time of my tenth birthday, my mum began exploring a range of other religions and various spiritual practices. I was apart of her journey for five to six years and eventually just turned my back on it all. I have never returned to organised religion, but now days I’m more open to the a range of possibilities out there (the universe is a big ass place), and I’m not closed off to the lessons hidden within the ancient teachings of most religions. 

I also think some of the benefits of those experiences in my youth created a strong interest in the well-being of my fellow man, also a massive interest in the human psyche and the play between good and evil in people. I think that’s reflected in most of my music, especially in my earlier music, I felt my songs had to have purpose and portray a valuable message for others as well as myself. 

TMFTML: Do you think Ireland moving away from those same traditions as a country is having a positive effect on our mental health and well-being as a society? Do you notice any negative effects this shift has had? 
TOMÁS: I definitely think it’s effected our country, both for better and worse. I’ll never agree with the behavior of the catholic church (we all know how that panned out), but I do think we’ve over looked some of the benefits of some spiritual practices. How prayer and meditation can help clarify your thoughts and relieve stress and with the hectic lives we all live now I think elements of those practices could really help some people. We’ve also lost the strong sense of community we once had as a catholic nation. I don’t think there has been any unifying community that has come close to bringing people together like the church did. 
TMFTML: What are your plans for the band? Bedroom noodles, or world domination? Somewhere in between? 
TOMÁS: Noodles in bed is always gonna be messy, and I don’t think I have the energy for world domination. I think I’ll always continue to make music, it’s good for the soul, but I also love live performance and I’d like to do that full time. So if we could carve a stable career in music where we can all sustain a decent livelihood and gain some recognition for the art we make without loosing the run of ourselves, I’ll be a happy camper. 
TMFTML: Thanks for taking the time to chat to me! Where can we catch you live in the near future? 

TOMÁS: No problem! We play ‘The Fun Machine’ in Fibber Magees, Dublin on Sept 12th and The Roisin Dubh Galway on September 13th. Tickets to both shows will be available on the door 😉

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And So I Watch You From Afar announce 4 Irish tour dates.

Ahead of the release of their fifth studio album, Belfast instrumental rockers And So I Watch You From Afar have announced a string of tour dates this December. The four piece are truly a a sonic force best experienced live. This coupled with the fact that they very rarely tour Ireland means that tickets will likely be in short supply after they go on sale tomorrow morning.

The dates are:

December 28: Academy, Dublin
December 29: Garbo’s, Castlebar, Co. Mayo
December 30: Cyprus Avenue, Cork
December 31: Roisin Dubh, Galway

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Derek Ellard launches brilliant new single ‘To Each Their Own’ in Bruxelles tonight!

Galway singer-songwriter Derek Ellard is back with a brilliant new single. ‘To Each Their Own’ is not your usual ‘one man with a guitar and his heart on his sleeve’ fare. The production here is slick and polished, complete with rhythm section and some glistening harmonies.

Derek is a loop station wizard live and those layered techniques are present here too. It’s great songwriting with some really interesting tempo changes and dynamics to burn.

You can catch Derek Ellard live tonight in Bruxelles at The Zodiac Sessions for the first in a string of launch gigs across the country.

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race the flux press shot

LISTEN: New single ‘Matty Rusko’ from Galway’s Race the Flux

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Galway band Race the Flux continue on their steady climb to the world stage today with the release of their new single ‘Matty Rusko’.

Our first introduction to Race the Flux came in the form of their 2013 Mini Album ‘Dutch Buffalo’, a no holds barred teeth-gritting-head-banging blend of electronic post rock goodness.  While it’s a brilliant record that really has stood the test of time, it did lean heavily on their influences. The stand out track definitely has to be  ‘Can I?’

For the follow up to ‘Dutch Buffalo’ they enlisted the help of Belfast producer and ex Oppenheimer axeman Rocky O’Reilly in Start Together Studios. Rocky is the man responsible for capturing And So I Watch You From Afar’s blistering live sound and translating it to record.

The difference in production and the progression in the bands songwriting ability was glaringly obvious on last years followup EP ‘Olympians’. There was a real breadth of different styles and dynamic shifts squeezed in to such a small amount of time and songs. ‘Olympians’ really sees Race the Flux coming into their own, shedding their more obvious influences and finding their sound. Check out ‘Olympus Mons’ for a great example of this.

‘Matty Rusko’ is another creative and sonic leap for the band, featuring math rock rhythms juxtaposed with Joe Padfield’s anthemic orating and some really interesting interplay between guitars and bass. This song promises to be a big one for them and will hopefully help to secure them some bigger slots on this summers festival circuit. Having made their Electric Picnic debut last year on the Electric Arena Stage, they’ve now also been longlisted for the  Glastonbury Emerging Talent competition. Luckily, you can catch them sooner and closer than that! They’ll be playing 2 dates in Dublin and Cork over the next 2 months with support from Dublin grunge duo Pranks. There’s also a London headliner thrown in for good measure! Details for the shows are below.

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race the flux pranks matty rusko tour

Meltybrains? announce Irish/UK tour on the back of new releases

meltybrains

Dublin masked melody makers Meltybrains? have been busy bees lately. They’ve released 3 new singles in as many months and are about to embark on an Irish/UK tour starting this Friday.

melty tour

Never a band to bow to convention, they released the first song ‘New Don’ on a limited edition run of 100 signature red masks. The song starts with an inviting yet slightly unnerving melody before developing into a haunting soundtrack you can imagine being chased through the woods to.

‘Wiggly Worms’ tells the age old tale of meeting your partner’s parents for the first time from the perspective of both parties. It features uplifting choruses and is delivered in their unmistakable style.

‘Heartfelt Hummer’ is a laid back song with groove to burn. Check the video’s description for the hilarious stories behind the lyrics.

Meltybrains? are a sight to behold live and the stage is where they are truly in their element. `Their energy is infectious and their tight displays of musical prowess are well worth a watch. Get yourself down to one of these shows and see for yourself!

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Live Review: Overhead, The Albatross, Race The Flux & Participant at The Workmans Club

Overhead, The Albatross @ The Workmans Club

Overhead the Albatross took over the Workman’s Club in Dublin last Saturday for what promised to be a night to remember. Participant started things off, playing some of the songs off his new EP ‘Content’. These songs are really great, but the live iterations were less fully formed than I was expecting. While everything was there, the energy seemed to dip in parts that were heavy on the backing tracks. Participant could definitely benefit from more involved live arrangements or possibly a live band. Either way I’m very interested to see what he does next.

The crowd started to swell for Galway Electro-Rockers Race The Flux. The band made their presence felt immediately, bursting in to ‘Olympus Mons’ from their Olympians EP.  These guys really set the tone for the evening, coaxing the crowd into coming closer and rewarding them for their bravery with song after song of chest thumping RAWK! Upcoming single ‘Matty Rusko’ is a welcome addition and the instantly recognisable ‘Can I’ threatens to bring the house down. If you get the chance to see these guys don’t hesitate, their recent Electric Arena set at Electric Picnic suggest that they won’t be gracing such small stages for long.

At last the main event! Overhead, The Albatross made their way to the stage to greet a now completely sold out crowd. The guys really outdid themselves in terms of lighting and stage production and it really adds to the already electric atmosphere. ‘Flubirds’ is first up, starting slow to ease the crowd in to things before building to a triumphant climax. Every person in the room now knows what they’re in for. ‘Telekinetic Forest Guard‘ comes sweeping in next followed by some new tracks  ‘Bara’ and ‘Daeku’. Could these be from the fabled first album? Let’s hope so, because they’re both fantastic! Just when things were starting to get sweaty, disaster struck. 2 minutes into the bands most recent release Big River Man, the power in the entire venue(and half of Temple Bar) just went. It was a strange moment, it happened really suddenly so the crowd we’re still jumping and Ben was still playing the drums along side some really tinny sounding unamplified electric guitars. Than everyone was just standing around confused for a second before they realised what had happened. Someone actually captured the moment here:

Frontman Joe, never one to let a good crowd go unsurfed launched himself off the stage and got carried all the way to the back of the room.
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Lot’s of chants of ‘LADDER, LADDER, LADDER’ ensued and then it just kind of….ended. Well, although a little disappointing it was definitely memorable and for me that’s enough. Here’s the full version of ‘Big River Man’ for anyone who’s jonesing for it after the show! Make sure to check out the photos below.